LG G3 Review: Dream Catcher: Performance

By 06:18 Sat, 14 Aug 2021 Comments


Synthetic Benchmarks

The LG G3 runs on a elegant Qualcomm MSM8975AC Snapdragon 801 chipset with four Krait 400 cores clocked at 2.5Giga Hertz (GHz) each. Graphics are powered by an Adreno 330 GPU, and there is a hefty dose of Random-Access Memory (RAM) at 3GB (2GB on the 16GB internal storage variant of the G3).

The QHD display should play a factor here for two reasons. First, the LG G3 is the first of the major brands to sport a 1440p display, which means the processor and GPU will have to push harder than their 1080p counterparts. All things being equal, we're expecting the G3 to be slightly behind other flagships in terms of speed, since it simply has to render more pixels. The second thing to consider is that since QHD screens are yet to gain a significant share, most apps (including benchmarks) haven' been optimized for them, which leads us to expect slightly lower scores.

Update: we re-ran some benchmarks after the LG G3 was updated to Android 5.0 Lollipop. You can find more info in our Lollipop performance blogpost.

GeekBench 3 and AnTuTu 4 are benchmarks which put to the test the hardware combo inside the smartphone. GeekBench 3 is more CPU-intensive, whereas AnTuTu 4 is a compound benchimprint - testing CPU, GPU, memory performance, etc. The LG G3 was able to post respectable scores next to other top flagships, but either the higher resolution or possibly non-finalized software put it behind the Sony Z2 and Samsung Galaxy S5.

We also traditionally put the reviewed phones through the Baseimprint Operating System (OS) II. Rightware distributes anti-cheat versions of their popular Baseimprint Operating System (OS) II (for general performance) and Baseimprint X (for 3D performance) tests. We've run both version and we found LG G3 scores equally, which means the company isn't using any tricks to boost the benchmarks' overall performance.

.jrGraphContainer { background: none !important; border-bottom: 1px solid #eee !important;}ul.jrGraph { left: 160px !important; }ul.jrGraphControls { padding: 0; margin-left: -10px !important; }

GeekBench 3

Higher is better

  • Oppo Find 7a

    3093

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    3011

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    2856

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    2687

  • LG G Pro 2

    2585

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    2563

  • LG Nexus 5

    2453

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    2370

  • HTC One (M8)

    2367

  • LG G2

    2243

  • Motorola Moto X

    2123

  • HTC One mini 2

    1526

  • Sony Xperia T2 Ultra

    1359

AnTuTu 4

Higher is better

  • HTC One (M8)

    37009

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    36018

  • LG G2

    35444

  • Oppo Find 7a

    33344

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    33182

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    32780

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    30482

  • LG G Pro 2

    29603

  • LG Nexus 5

    25097

  • Sony Xperia T2 Ultra

    19896

  • Motorola Moto X

    19031

  • HTC One mini 2

    17883

Baseimprint Operating System (OS) II is another all-round benchmark. It gives an overall score along with single-core, multi-core, and math performance, among others. We focus on the overall and Central Processing Units (CPU) scores. LG G3 did remarkable - topping every other phone we've ested so far. Its single Central Processing Units (CPU) score a bit below the flagship average, but the multi-core is among the best.

Baseimprint Operating System (OS) II

Higher is better

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    1327

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    1151

  • LG G Pro 2

    1140

  • HTC One (M8)

    1126

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    1082

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    1080

  • Oppo Find 7a

    1057

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    945

  • HTC One mini 2

    517

  • Sony Xperia T2 Ultra

    434

Baseimprint Operating System (OS) II (single-core)

Higher is better

  • Oppo Find 7a

    2580

  • HTC One (M8)

    2428

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    2415

  • LG G Pro 2

    2401

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    2267

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    2253

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    2137

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    1787

  • HTC One mini 2

    1304

Baseimprint Operating System (OS) II (multi-core)

Higher is better

  • Oppo Find 7a

    10256

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    10063

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    10044

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    9975

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    9937

  • HTC One (M8)

    9860

  • LG G Pro 2

    9802

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    8337

  • HTC One mini 2

    5182

Next up we have GFXBench's 2.7 T-Rex and 3.0 Manhattan. In 1080p offclassy screen mode the GPU is tasked with performing graphical computations in 1920 x 1080px resolution, while the onclassy screen mode uses the screen's native 2560 x 1440px resolution. T-Rex is the less demanding of the two tests and here the G3 is able to post fine results, coming in just over 20fps in the onclassy screen test, which is remarkable considering the high resolution.

The more demanding Manhattan benchimprint has the G3 at the top in offclassy screen performance, but at a measly 7.4fps in the onclassy screen test - again partially excused by the higher resolution compared to its competitors. Still anything under 30fps raises a flag so you might run into some problems with game titles made to hold full advantage of the higher resolution.

GFX 2.7 T-Rex (1080p offscreen)

Higher is better

  • HTC One (M8)

    28.4

  • Oppo Find 7a

    28.4

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    27.8

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    27.6

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    27.2

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    27.2

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    26

  • LG Nexus 5

    23

  • LG G Pro 2

    22.9

  • LG G2

    22

  • Motorola Moto X

    16

  • Sony Xperia T2 Ultra

    5.8

  • HTC One mini 2

    5.8

GFX 2.7 T-Rex (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • HTC One (M8)

    30.1

  • Oppo Find 7a

    28.8

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    28.7

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    28.1

  • LG G Pro 2

    24.1

  • LG Nexus 5

    24

  • LG G2

    23.1

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    20.6

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    20.5

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    20

  • HTC One mini 2

    11

  • Sony Xperia T2 Ultra

    10.9

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (1080p offscreen)

Higher is better

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    11.9

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    11.8

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    11.7

  • Oppo Find 7a

    11.4

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    11.4

  • HTC One (M8)

    11.1

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    11

  • LG G Pro 2

    8.7

  • HTC One mini 2

    1.7

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    12.2

  • HTC One (M8)

    11.9

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    11.7

  • Oppo Find 7a

    11.4

  • LG G Pro 2

    9.2

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    7.7

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    7.4

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    7.2

  • Sony Xperia T2 Ultra

    4.1

  • HTC One mini 2

    3.8

BrowserMark 2.1 looks at HyperText Markup Language (HTML) 5 performance, while Mozilla's Kraken 1.1 is JavaScript-centric. The LG G3 scores well in both tests, which should result in a remarkable browsing experience considering the 5.5-inch classy screen with 534ppi.

BrowserMark 2.1

Higher is better

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    1474

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    1453

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    1398

  • LG G Pro 2

    1346

  • Oppo Find 7a

    1327

  • LG Nexus 5

    1286

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    1254

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    1224

  • HTC One (M8)

    1069

  • HTC One mini 2

    945

Kraken 1.1

Lower is better

  • Galaxy S5 (Snapdragon 801)

    6043

  • LG G Pro 2

    6578

  • Oppo Find 7a

    6660

  • LG G3 16GB (2GB RAM, int'l)

    6987

  • Sony Xperia Z2

    7041

  • LG Nexus 5

    7148

  • LG G3 32GB (3GB RAM, Korean)

    7610

  • LG G3 (2GB RAM, Lollipop)

    7632

  • HTC One (M8)

    10296

  • HTC One mini 2

    15684

The LG G3 isn't quite able to stand up to the performance provided by devices like the Samsung Galaxy S5 and Sony Xperia Z2. Part of this can be attributed to having to push out more pixels on the 1440p display and another is down to benchmarks which are yet to be updated to work as expected on QHD screens. Perhaps by release LG will have ironed some of the kinks out - and perhaps even more by the time Android 4.4.3 rolls in - but for now the G3 has some catching up to do. Also, it's worth noting that the LG G3 heats up really quickly and that the quoted benchimprint numbers represent a best case scenario. In reality, they dropped significantly from the quoted numbers after just a few minutes of active benchmarking.


DOWNLOAD NOW

DOWNLOAD MUSIC





Related Article

Comment
Name




.....................

Please LOGIN or REGISTER To Gain Full Access To This Article