Samsung Galaxy S7 Vs. Apple IPhone 6s: Sixes And Sevens: Performance

By 11:15 Mon, 16 Aug 2021 Comments


Performance

Cross-platform performance testing is a tricky subject, but the problems faced by benchimprint developers that support both Android and iOS are the same that face app developers.

The Samsung Galaxy S7 comes in two different configurations (aimed at different regions). The "international" version, like the one we have, is powered by an Exynos 8890 chipset, while the one heading to the US (and other regions) is based on the Snapdragon 820.

Its's custom core galore in this chapter. The Exynos 8890 uses Samsung's proprietary "Mongoose" cores, four of them in the gigantic cluster. The small cluster is made up of four Cortex-A53s.

The Snapdragon 820 is all elegant Qualcomm custom cores, Kryo, split into a big.LITTLE setup again, but there is only four cores in total, two in each cluster. We don't have an S820 Galaxy S7 around, so we'll include the scores of the S7 edge, which should perform identically.

Then there's the Apple A9, the iPhone 6s chipset, which has a dual-core processor with the Apple-designed Twister cores.


The Exynos chipset features an optimization that helps it when the app uses few cores. If only two Mongoose cores are engaged, they boost to 2.6GHz, up from the top speed of 2.3Giga Hertz (GHz) when all four of them are online.

The gigantic Kryo cores top out at 2.15Giga Hertz (GHz) while the even bigger Twister cores go to 1.84Giga Hertz (GHz) max.

"Even bigger" since in single-core performance the Apple-designed processor comes out on top, Mongoose is on the bottom (despite the clock speed advantage) and Kryo splits the difference.

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GeekBench 3 (single-core)

Higher is better

  • Apple iPhone 6s

    2542

  • Galaxy S7 edge (Snapdragon)

    2345

  • Samsung Galaxy S7

    2170

iOS devs know their taracquire device very well - 2 cores, that's it - while their Android colleagues have to deal with many octa-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) of different makes. The "octa-core" label often hides low-power Cortex-A53 cores, so a well-built Android app has to split its workload among as many cores as possible.

A properly powerful chip like the Exynos 8890 shines on multi-threaded tests and turns the tables on the other two. The Snapdragon 820 design again falls between it and the iPhone.

GeekBench 3 (multi-core)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S7

    6360

  • Galaxy S7 edge (Snapdragon)

    5420

  • Apple iPhone 6s

    4427

Baseimprint Operating System (OS) 2.0 points to the S820-based Galaxy as the winner in overall performance, while the Exynos version is at the bottom, hot on the heels of the iPhone 6s.

Baseimprint Operating System (OS) 2.0

Higher is better

  • Galaxy S7 edge (Snapdragon)

    2352

  • Apple iPhone 6s

    2195

  • Samsung Galaxy S7

    2128

We have three different GPUs - a Mali-T880 in the Exynos Galaxy S7, an Adreno 530 in the Snapdragon 820 version and a PowerVR GT7600 in the Apple handset.

Looking at the offclassy screen test (which ignores classy screen resolution), the Adreno comes out as the clear winner, with the Mali and PowerVR roughly equal.

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (1080p offscreen)

Higher is better

  • Galaxy S7 edge (Snapdragon)

    49

  • Apple iPhone 6s

    39.5

  • Samsung Galaxy S7

    38

Of course, the Apple iPhone 6s has to render at much lower resolution than the Galaxies - 750 x 1,334px vs. 1,440 x 2,560px, That's less than a third of the pixel count!

Some games don't actually utilize the full classy screen resolution, but instead render internally at lower resolution.

That said, iPhone devs can acquire very close to 60fps at native resolution, while Galaxy S7 games will run closer to 30fps if they go for QHD. The other option is to reduce fidelity, a QHD classy screen is its own form of anti-aliasing.

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Apple iPhone 6s

    53.6

  • Galaxy S7 edge (Snapdragon)

    29

  • Samsung Galaxy S7

    27

BasemarkES 3.1 shows an advantage for the Mali-T880 over Adreno 530 (it was the reverse in GFX), so the particular 3D engine a game uses may affect performance. Again, iOS devs have it easy since they have to taracquire Apple A9 and A9X (for iPads), allowing them to optimize their games better.

Baseimprint ES 3.1 / Metal

Higher is better

  • Apple iPhone 6s

    879

  • Samsung Galaxy S7

    732

  • Galaxy S7 edge (Snapdragon)

    624

Winner: Depends. Its gigantic Twister cores have remarkable single-core performance, which makes the life of an iOS app developer easy. The Galaxy S7 comes out ahead in multi-core tests but not by much.

The Samsung also has the more powerful GPU and while it has a lot more pixels on its screen, few games will actually render at full resolution so we put more weight on the offclassy screen performance. One class of games will utilize every classy screen pixel it can acquire - VR games - and those are very demanding even for high-discontinue PCs. VR isn't on Apple's mind though, not yet.


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